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UNC to Open, Close Early

UNC Chapel Hill will re-open its campus for the fall semester but will start and finish it early “in an effort to stay ahead of that second wave” of the coronavirus, university Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz announced Thursday.

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LATEST ARTICLES

Town Launches Campaign Encouraging Use of Masks

The town of Chapel Hill is urging everyone over 12 years of age to wear masks or face coverings when indoors in a public place and outdoors when at least six feet of physical distancing is difficult to maintain.


Music in the Neighborhood

It is highly unlikely that we will be going to concerts or festivals anytime soon. These kinds of events are missed, however, so when Chatham Rabbits showed up in the Glen Lennox neighborhood on a recent Sunday morning it was great fun.



Chapel Hill is Lighting Up

The night light might be bright. Duke Energy is expected to complete a month-long project of replacing 2,000 street lights on major streets in Chapel Hill with more environmentally friendly LED lights by the end of May.


Intriguing Insects to Arouse our Wonder

When out taking nature walks, our attention is often drawn to the easily visible wildlife around us, such as birds flying by, squirrels scurrying up tree trunks and chipmunks dashing across fields and grassy areas.


Revisiting Walden, in the Time of Coronavirus

Henry David Thoreau knew a thing or two about social distancing. In 1845 he self-quarantined for two years and two months at a one-room cabin he built himself on the shores of Walden Pond outside of Concord, Massachusetts. Neither by edict nor necessity, but rather by intention, Thoreau wanted to “simplify, simplify.”


How Foxglove Got Its Name

When I’m thinking about a plant I like to start at the beginning, with its name. Today, I’m thinking about foxglove. A few weeks back, Kit told you a foxglove plant mysteriously appeared in my garden. After much debate, she and I concluded that my garden gnome was responsible for planting foxglove seeds.


Are we really ‘allinthistogether’?

#allinthistogether. Kinda. The hashtag trending on Twitter and Instagram evokes solidarity among the healthy and the sick, the employed and the paycheck-less, in the chaos wrought by COVID-19.


UNC to Open, Close Early

UNC Chapel Hill will re-open its campus for the fall semester but will start and finish it early “in an effort to stay ahead of that second wave” of the coronavirus, university Chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz announced Thursday.


THE ABSENTEE GARDENERS

How Foxglove Got Its Name

When I’m thinking about a plant I like to start at the beginning, with its name. Today, I’m thinking about foxglove. A few weeks back, Kit told you a foxglove plant mysteriously appeared in my garden. After much debate, she and I concluded that my garden gnome was responsible for planting foxglove seeds.

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ORANGE SLICES


THE WILD SIDE

Intriguing Insects to Arouse our Wonder

When out taking nature walks, our attention is often drawn to the easily visible wildlife around us, such as birds flying by, squirrels scurrying up tree trunks and chipmunks dashing across fields and grassy areas.

Read More

BIKE BEAT


THROUGH A TOWNIE’S LENS

Revisiting Walden, in the Time of Coronavirus

Henry David Thoreau knew a thing or two about social distancing. In 1845 he self-quarantined for two years and two months at a one-room cabin he built himself on the shores of Walden Pond outside of Concord, Massachusetts. Neither by edict nor necessity, but rather by intention, Thoreau wanted to “simplify, simplify.”

Read More

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

A Field of Dreams, Not Games

The first thing to know about baseball coaches is even when there aren’t games, they never stop being baseball coaches. When the players are away, there’s still a big field that requires constant mowing, watering and picking weeds.

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